Category Archives: Tingle Tuesday (ASMR)

Tingle Tuesday: ASMR Conventions

ASMR image1    As you may recall, last year, there was a concerted effort by a couple of folks in California to organize the first ever ASMR convention. It was an idea that had a lot of merit and caused a lot of buzz within the community, but ultimately proved too difficult to pull together and was cancelled before it really got off the ground.

At the time, I remember there being a lot of comments on the Kickstarter site from those who were interested in the prospect of a convention but didn’t feel it should cost money, didn’t like the location it was being held in and a myriad of other complaints too numerous to discuss in a single blog post. The bottom line is that it didn’t come together and it confirms for me that you have to walk before you can run and sometimes you have to crawl before you can even stand on your own two feet.

As someone who had been contacted to appear at this event, I still think the concept of an ASMR convention is still a good idea, though I think it maybe wise to start small and build over time. Most libraries have a community room that can be booked for local events and what better way to keep such an event low cost than by booking a community room. No, you may not have killer lighting and sound people, but some of the original ASMR videos were made with nothing more than a cell phone camera so I think we can forgo some of the bells and whistles and still have a nice event.

I also imagine there are some ASMRtists who live locally and might be willing to come out in order to build their audience while promoting ASMR awareness. While we all know many of the bigger names, my guess is there are countless others just getting started who have plenty of tingles to offer and if the drive isn’t too far out of their way, it may just be worth their time and effort to present. If you ask nicely, you may also be able to get a more well-known ASMRtist to film an exclusive greeting or short trigger video for your event. (Because she couldn’t travel outside of Canada yet, Ilse Blansert did that for the launch of our book and it was well-received by everyone!)

Another way to garner some additional presenters would be to contact a nurse or someone in the health care profession who experiences ASMR and can talk about the subject from a clinical point of view. Other thoughts for ASMR presenters may be hair care professionals who experience the phenomenon, teachers, or hypnotherapists who can lend some additional credibility to the event.

You really don’t have to have a lot of sponsors or a huge promotional budget for a low-profile event either. If you are using a library room, you’ll be listed in their calendar, you can write a short press release and send it to some area papers and you may even ask your librarian to showcase a selection of books, audio books and videos that could be considered ASMR-related materials (e.g. Bob Ross Joy of Painting DVDs, guided meditation CDs, etc…) You might also be able to get a local bookstore to partner with you and offer copies of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to ASMR for sale at your event as well. For the record, I am not writing this simply to promote my book…I was commissioned to write it by the publisher and do not make any royalties off of the sale of it.

My point is, that ASMR gatherings are still a very good idea and something that can bring about a whole new level of awareness to our community. There is a way to make it work and please as many people as you can without looking as though you are profiting from the event and keeping the whole thing manageable. I encourage you to go for it. This is something I plan to do more of this year and I am in hopes that I will not be alone. Until next time….tingle on.

 

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Tingle Tuesday ASMR Porn

asmr            Well, I guess I am not surprised that it happened, but I am kind of concerned by it and worry that as long as it continues, ASMR will struggle to be accepted by mainstream clinicians. Naturally, I am talking about ASMR porn.

After telling everyone that ASMR is not about fetishes and sex, there are some ASMRtists who are making a name for themselves applying ASMR techniques against a backdrop that is infused with sexual innuendo. For the record, I do not have a problem with anyone making an honest buck and I am not prudish enough to pretend that sex doesn’t sell, but I really hoped that ASMR would not go off in this direction. Unfortunately for some ASMRtists…it has.

One of these particular videos popped up in my suggestion queue one night and because I am a researcher, I watched it. While I am sure that there may be some people who can feel the ASMR sensation based on this individual’s voice and actions, it did not work on me and based on the shear number of subscribers she had in such a very short amount of time, I highly doubt most folks are tuning in to get some sleep. Like I said, I don’t judge the individual for doing it, but as ASMR has become more monetized, I think we will see more of this coming up just as we have seen an influx in people using the high-end microphones, cameras and special effects.

Naturally I am not in favor of ASMR porn. I think it cheapens the ASMR platform and I have my doubts about those people who say they truly tune in for the ASMR experience. If you are getting an ASMR tingle from these individuals, it is NOT because of what they are wearing, it is due to the frequency of their voice, and your individual ASMR triggers. They would still be able to give you an ASMR buzz if they were wearing jeans and a t-shirt instead of a see-through negligee. I truly hope this new trend in ASMR porn will dissipate fairly quickly and that these ASMRtists will transition into more traditional ASMR content. I think it cheapens the ASMR image. I worry for their cyber safety and it’s not something that the community should promote. But that’s just my two cents on the subject.

 

 

 

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Tingle Tuesday ASMR in Pop Culture

Happy New Year Tingleheads! I have decided to start making Tingle Tuesday a monthly feature on my blog so that I can hopefully keep up with it a little better throughout the year. I hope you all enjoy the new information and insight I bring to you in 2016 and you continue to remain part of the ASMR community.

For January, I wanted to talk a little about ASMR in pop culture. While we all know that ASMR is not new, how many of us have heard it referred to in movies, TV shows, books, etc…? Naturally, it may not be called ASMR, but you may be surprised to learn that it is brought up from time to time.

RTB            I binge watch any number of TV shows and old movies and one day while watching a Hallmark movie called “Riding the Bus With My Sister” there is a scene in which the girl playing Andie MacDowell’s character as a child runs her fingers up and down the forearm of her mentally challenged sister. The girl is laughing because the gesture tickles her but later in the movie, Andie and Rosie O’Donnell (who plays the adult version of the MR sister) are lying together on a bed and Andy asks Rosie if she wants her to tickle her. Rosie agrees and Andie begins running her fingers up and down Rosie’s forearm as Rosie says, “It tingles!”

My ears perked up immediately because I knew what she had to mean. (This also makes me wonder if Rosie O’Donnell experiences ASMR as well.) However that movie came out long before any media attention was given to the phenomenon so I thought that was pretty neat.

Brandon            The second example occurred on a show even older and may surprise readers when I tell you that it was Beverly Hills 90210. (The original one) Brandon is interested in a massage therapist who works part time at the Peach Pit and when she asks him to let her give him a massage, he later reports that when she touched him, he had this feeling come all over him. I believe he also referred to it as tingles. I thought it was so wild that the writers came up with that and put it in the show and considering that was in the early 1990s, I wonder how many other times the ASMR phenomenon has been described on television.

Have any of you heard ASMR-like descriptions in popular culture such as movies and TV? If so where…I am really curious to find out where all ASMR has been mentioned. Comment Below and I’ll talk to you all soon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tingle Tuesday: All the Bells and Whistles

Violet      One of the challenges ASMRtists face is to come up with new and creative ways of presenting ASMR triggers without sounding like they are on repeat. I have heard several ASMRtists say that their fans write to say they want something exactly like the previous video…but completely different.

While viewers may want another ear examination, tapping or scratching videos, ASMRtists strive to offer something more. The more experience they have in making ASMR content, the more they want to do something new and fresh. As I am sure many of you have seen, some of them have really gone to the outer limits ad have pushed the boundaries of what ASMR content is and what it can be. I applaud these efforts and I can’t help being impressed by the filmmaking skills of these people whose original videos began with nothing more than a camera phone.

Unfortunately all of the bells and whistles don’t work for me. A few months ago, one of my favorite ASMRtists created an amazingly unique video that I watched from start to finish but could not be triggered by. I consider this person an acquaintance so I mean no disrespect to their work when I say this. (And before you ask, no, it wasn’t Violet…I used her pic because it WASN’T her.) I actually wrote them and congratulated them on the video saying “I was so impressed I kept watching to see what you would do next and couldn’t succumb to the included suggestions.” (I am pleased to say that they took that comment as the compliment I intended it to be.)

Bob ross           I suppose this is why Bob Ross does not trigger me. I know, I know…I have just dissed the unofficial patron saint of ASMR. But honestly, I have to try so hard to be triggered by him! I totally get why he triggers people. He certainly has a soothing voice, but I typically get so into the painting that I become mesmerized by what he is doing and the triggers come secondary.

I have discovered that in addition to people having a wide variety of triggers, there is also a difference in the way they prefer to receive those triggers. For some, it is all of the bells and whistles and special effects. For others, it’s the unintentional ASMR effect. For me, I am a middle of the road kind of person who, if I had to try and make a laundry list of what works for me, I’d sound like a nut job. Generally speaking, I like organic triggers, not something overly fanciful. Whispering works for me, but not random whispering…one has to be actually talking about something or walking me through a process. I love some special effects, but I prefer they be an unexpected surprise in the video rather than a full hour of them. See what I mean? I sound weird!

I suppose this is why I don’t make requests of ASMRtists. I feel that they have to be true to their art and do what they want to do. If it’s the big productions, that’s fine with me. I’m sure they work for a lot of people and who am I to complain. If they do something small scale that works for me and not others; that’s great too. I think it is important to always remember that these amazing artists provide free content for our enjoyment and I for one will not look a gift horse in the mouth!

Untile next time, tingle on!

J-

Follow Julie Young on Twitter: @JulieYoung14

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Join INDY ASMR: https://www.facebook.com/IndyASMR

Read this blog post at: www.thewaterwhispers.com

Read The Complete Idiot’s Guide to ASMR: http://www.amazon.com/Idiots-Guides-ASMR-Julie-Young/dp/1615648186/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1432674500&sr=8-1&keywords=Idiots+guides%3A+ASMR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tingle Tuesday: ASMR Dependency and Immunity

ASMR image1      Is ASMR harmful in anyway? Can you become addicted to it? What happens when it stops working? These are all questions we have seen on various message boards so allow me to put a few concerns to rest. When the whisper community/ASMR community began, it was all about helping people relax and get to sleep at night. This remains the primary goal of ASMRtists everywhere; therefore ASMR is not intentionally harmful in any way.

That being said, safety is always the key word when indulging in any practice that operates on a subliminal level or has the ability to put you to sleep or in a hypnotic trance for a period of time. If you are knew to the ASMR phenomenon, here are some top tips and rules to keep in mind:

  1. Do not try and trigger your tingles while operating a car or heavy machinery.
  2. Screen all videos/audio content prior to using them for ASMR purposes.
  3. Use foreign language content judiciously. (Hey, I am triggered by it myself and most ASMRtists are just offering something different, but keep in mind although YOU may not know what is being said, the subconscious might and I am aware that there was one ASMRtist who was being very derogatory in their FL content. So, just be aware. )
  4. Screen content prior to allowing your children to watch it. This seems fairly obvious, but it bears mentioning.
  5. Discuss any concerns you have with your personal physician.

As far as we know, it is not possible to become “addicted” to ASMR however; it is possible to develop an unhealthy reliance on it. Allow me to explain. If your love of ASMR content is preventing you from enjoying a full life outside of a computer screen, then you may want to do something about that. Any psychologist will tell you that substituting a real life for a virtual one is not healthy, but be assured it’s your behavior not the content doing that to you. I am of the opinion that although ASMR can help you get through the rough times when you are in need of a good night’s rest, it is often most effective when you are doing everything you can to have a normal, happy, healthy life. Remember, it is a supplement, not a way of life and you lesson the chances of ASMR immunity when it does not become an everyday occurrence.

ASMR immunity is something that comes up frequently and essentially refers to those moments when your go to videos stop working and no matter what you do, you cannot seem to get the ASMR tingles to occur. Rest assured this is very normal and typically comes from over exposure to the same video and ASMRtist. When we get used to their voice, their actions or if we have watch the video so much we have it memorized it can negate the effect. For some, the solution is to find a new ASMRtist while others take a break for a while and then come back to it. If you have experienced this yourself rest assured there is nothing wrong, and more importantly, the condition doesn’t last forever.

Untile next time, tingle on,

J-

Follow Julie Young on Twitter: @JulieYoung14

Follow Julie Young on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/authorjulieyoung

Join INDY ASMR: https://www.facebook.com/IndyASMR

Read this blog post at: www.thewaterwhispers.com

Read The Complete Idiot’s Guide to ASMR: http://www.amazon.com/Idiots-Guides-ASMR-Julie-Young/dp/1615648186/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1432674500&sr=8-1&keywords=Idiots+guides%3A+ASMR

 

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Tingle Tuesday: Fission and ASMR

Fission   This is another debate that comes up frequently on ASMR message boards and in social media. Is it the same thing as goose bumps or the feeling you get when you hear a really great song on the radio? I have a feeling I am going to tick a lot of people off with my assessment on this subject, but I’m just going to go for it: it’s all in the same family of feelings.

It distresses me that as a community, members frequently bash one another because of their goose bumps or fission feelings that “aren’t” technically the ASMR feelings we have accepted as our own criteria. If I may step on a soapbox for a minute, these feelings are very valid and can help folks discover their true ASMR triggers. Telling someone “no, it’s not the same thing” essentially shuts them off from that discovery and is a disservice to the continued understanding of this area of the mind.

We tend to accept on premise that ASMR probably has something to do with a release of dopamine and we know that the chills experienced during music illicit the same brain response. We also know that ASMR often feels like goose bumps without the raised skin effect so are we not shooting ourselves in the foot by alienating other conditions rather than learning from them?

When I began writing the ASMR book, I spent a lot of time reading about things that are seemingly unconnected to ASMR. For example: “Why do people watch things?” “Why are certain sounds more pleasant than others?” These queries did not always lead me to relaxation sites but often led me to education sites such as “How do people take in information? Sight, sound and touch” and audiology sites that explained head space, the inner workings of binaural sound and biological concepts that I should have memorized way back when.

Because we still know so little about ASMR, it is vital that we examine as much information as we can from a variety of fields of study without prejudice. Finding similarities as well as differences will lead us to better information that will help researchers develop more ways in which to study the phenomenon and give it widespread credence throughout the entire scientific community.

Until next time, Tingle On,

J-

Follow Julie Young on Twitter: @JulieYoung14

Follow Julie Young on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/authorjulieyoung

Join INDY ASMR: https://www.facebook.com/IndyASMR

Read this blog post at: www.thewaterwhispers.com

Read The Complete Idiot’s Guide to ASMR: http://www.amazon.com/Idiots-Guides-ASMR-Julie-Young/dp/1615648186/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1432674500&sr=8-1&keywords=Idiots+guides%3A+ASMR

 

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Tingle Tuesday: Could there be an ASMR therapy center?

ASMR Angel    This is a question I see asked online frequently and one that is often eluded to in ASMR role play videos: Could there ever come a day when there might be a real life ASMR center where people could go and get their tingles on through the services of an ASMRtist? (Note: I can only answer as someone who lives in the United States. I can’t vouch for the possibility in other countries.)

Technically speaking, we already do when we go to a spa or a salon and have our tingles triggered by a professional aesthetician, but if we are talking about a traditional branded storefront with a menu of ASMR services and a handful of ASMRtists ready to perform them…well, I think that is still a long way off. Don’t get me wrong. There are ASMRtists who offer personal consultations through Skype and I think in time, there may be more ASMRtists who will offer live ASMR demonstrations and book one-on-one appointments through a network of referrals in order to meet a demand for this kind of service, but an actual center? That could take a while. (In the meantime, we may have to contend ourselves with some online storefronts such as ASMR Angel’s “Penny’s Posh Picnics.”)

The primary reason I say this is because there is no way to regulate it and it will not take long for someone to shut it down, someone to get sued and a myriad of other problems to arise. I’m not trying to be a “Debbie Downer” about this, in fact…I think it’s a great idea, but from a practical standpoint, there are problems with the business model.

Years ago I was watching a segment on ABC’s 20/20 in which reporters were looking into “hair braiding” salons, which were being shut down left and right because the stylists were not licensed cosmetologists. Now these people were not cutting, straightening, or dying anyone’s hair. They were only braiding it and yet some entity wanted to shut them down or for the individuals to invest several thousands of dollars to get a license. While this rule varies from state to state and I am speaking in generalities here, I can only imagine what people in power could do to an ASMR center.

ASMR not only continues to be widely misunderstood by some, but as of this writing it has not been accepted by the clinical community as an official “alternative therapy.” With no research on it and the various practices used in the ASMR video segments, can you imagine anyone in power allowing this to go on as a legitimate business? Many ASMRtists fake real medical exams ands other services that require very real licenses in the real world. Sure, we could argue that people could sign a waiver and must acknowledge that the ASMRtist is not a medical doctor, but I just see too many people having BIG problems with this.

Of course there are those make up people at the mall who seem to be able to get away with helping clients apply products without a license and no one seems to mind them, but somehow I suspect that they would look at an ASMR center differently and have issues with it until someone creates some kind of training and certification program that can be offered, standardized and regulated. There may still be some raised eyebrows, but it would be a start toward creating the mainstream ASMR storefront in time.

Until Next Time, Tingle On!

J-

Follow Julie Young on Twitter: @JulieYoung14

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Join INDY ASMR: https://www.facebook.com/IndyASMR

Read this blog post at: www.thewaterwhispers.com

Read The Complete Idiot’s Guide to ASMR: http://www.amazon.com/Idiots-Guides-ASMR-Julie-Young/dp/1615648186/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1432674500&sr=8-1&keywords=Idiots+guides%3A+ASMR

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TingleTuesday: Studying the Sensation

Studying      In the movie The Sound of Music, the nuns of the abbey contemplate what to do with a problematic postulate in the song, “How Do You Solve a Problem Like Maria?” The lyrics compare taming the young woman to a variety of impossible tasks such as trying to catch a cloud and pinning it down, or attempting to keep a wave upon the sand,. However, those same words could easily be used to describe what it was like to try and write about the ASMR phenomenon.

ASMR is a feeling. It is real, but intangible. It affects a diverse group of people all over the world through a wide variety of audio, visual and tactile triggers in real time and through suggestion. It has been described as brain tingles, a brain buzz, a braingasm (but we’ll hold off on that term for another post), sparks, shocks, etc.…but somehow, it has escaped scientific inquiry until recently and at the present time, any research which has been done has not been published.

The reason for this may confuse a lot of ASMR experiencers who wonder what is taking so long, so let me explain. When someone decides to conduct a scientific study, they must first seek permission from an academic board of some kind. The researcher outlines the problem that they have identified, shows past studies into the same field (or comparative fields) and shows the board the processes they plan to follow in their own work. The board may or may not ask for clarification on the proposal, but once their permission is obtained, the researcher can begin to call out participants for the actual study itself.

After the participants give their consent to be part of the study, the actual experiment commences. This can be a long process depending on the scope of the research – sometimes even years. Afterwards, the results are charted, the data is analyzed and the entire project from conception to conclusion is compiled into a large document that few people outside of the research community can understand. (This is why many published studies are “bottom-lined” in press releases.)

Once the full paper is written, the researcher submits it to an academic journal in hopes that it will be peer-reviewed and published. This is not as easy as it looks. When the editor of the journal receives a paper for possible publication, it is forwarded to experts in the field for examination. These experts are charged with evaluating the quality of the submitted manuscript, requesting revisions or outright rejecting it if they conclude that the findings are flawed or that the science is invalid.

As you may imagine, there are few people who qualify as experts in the field of ASMR and even less who have conducted traditional research into the subject. Naturally this means that any paper would be subjected to those in the fields that the study pertained to (e.g. neurology) and as a general rule, traditional medicine has always had difficulty accepting alternative techniques (though they are getting better) which is why it may be a while before we actually start to see some authoritative work published in the field of ASMR.

With little to go on outside of conjecture and accepted beliefs, no access to specialized equipment and a two-month deadline to write a 275-page book about it, I had no choice but to break ASMR down little by little in order to try and determine what it is, where it comes from, how it works, why we need it and whether or not the scientific community really does know about it.

No doubt, I was grasping at straws, but hey, it’s a whole lot easier than trying to hold a moonbeam in your hand!

Follow Julie Young on Twitter: @JulieYoung14

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Join INDY ASMR: https://www.facebook.com/IndyASMR

Read this blog post at: www.thewaterwhispers.com

Read The Complete Idiot’s Guide to ASMR: http://www.amazon.com/Idiots-Guides-ASMR-Julie-Young/dp/1615648186/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1432674500&sr=8-1&keywords=Idiots+guides%3A+ASMR

 

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Tingle Tuesday: “What’s an ASMR?”

asmr    The first time I saw the term, I had no clue what it meant, how to pronounce it or what to make of it. After months of watching my happy little tingle videos, seemingly overnight their titles all contained a four letter…something: ASMR. Now, I didn’t know what an ASMR was (read: azzmer) but I avoided the term like the plague. At first I wasn’t sure if the term was used to distinguish the type of video I had been watching with something completely different (like something more sexual in nature.) However when it became so prevalent, I eventually looked it up.

It was then that I learned that Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) was a semi-scientific term to describe a perceptual phenomenon characterized by a tingly feeling that begins in the head or scalp and flows through the body causing it to relax. It was a term that was more or less made up in 2010 by healthcare IT worker Jenn Allen and promptly dismissed by the clinical community as nothing more than “pseudo science with a medical sounding name.”

While it was nice to have an “official” name connected with the sensation, I have to admit, I was a little confused by the lack of knowledge surrounding it. It wasn’t new. I knew that much having experienced it since I was seven, but if it wasn’t new then where was the research to back it up? If it was a type of biofeedback response that was elicited in medical practices as way to help people relax and cope with pain, why was the scientific community so keen to deny it or act like it wasn’t real?

As someone who had worked in the medical field for nearly a decade and continues to write about a variety of medical subjects, this made no sense to me. I couldn’t help wondering if the phenomenon that YouTubers were calling ASMR had another name at some point, one that was recognized by science but no one knew what it was. Was there some fundamental piece of the description missing that would cause some researcher somewhere to say, “Oh, you mean…” and fill in the blank with a well-thought out but obscure Latin term that no one had ever heard of before or was the real problem the fact that people were turning to YouTube to get a good night’s sleep?

I suspected it might be the latter and thus began my quest for answers. In September of 2013, I wrote my first article on ASMR, it was a local piece that simply introduced the phenomenon to those who may not have heard of it before. I began following the social media feeds of several ASMRtists and learned that several of my friends were already familiar with the sensation as well giving us permission to discuss it in the way that only “tingle heads” can.

In the months that followed it became obvious that the ASMR phenomenon was moving more into the mainstream, but I was still irritated by the fact that few reports I saw went beyond “tingle tales” or the connection between ASMR and Bob Ross. I watched well-regarded physicians offer possible explanations for the sensation with a shrug as if they really had no clue as to what was going on and commentators who acted like the whole thing was a big joke. Oh my Lord, people this can’t be that hard, I thought to myself. Someone is going to have to track this thing in and figure out what is going on.

Little did I know that I would become the “someone” who would do it.

Until next time, tingle on,

J-

Follow Julie Young on Twitter: @JulieYoung14

Follow Julie Young on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/authorjulieyoung

Join INDY ASMR: https://www.facebook.com/IndyASMR

Read this blog post at: www.thewaterwhispers.com

Read The Complete Idiot’s Guide to ASMR: http://www.amazon.com/Idiots-Guides-ASMR-Julie-Young/dp/1615648186/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1432674500&sr=8-1&keywords=Idiots+guides%3A+ASMR

 

 

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Tingle Tuesday: Finding the “Whisper Community”

Whispering     Like a lot of ASMR experiencers, I stumbled onto the online whisper community and their trigger videos by accident although I was more or less “involved” from the very beginning. Ever since Connie gave me that biofeedback tape, I was on the lookout for material that could cause the same relaxation response inside of me. I would seek out relaxation tapes/CDs at my local bookstore and at the library, but the selection was often limited.

I can’t pinpoint when I first turned to YouTube in search of relaxation videos, but I can say that my search to find something to settle my brain intensified in 2008 with the passing of my mom. If you have never lost your last parent, then you cannot imagine the desperate feeling of loss that comes along with it. I felt alone in the world. I couldn’t sleep. My entire biological schedule was turned around and I struggled to get used to the new “normal” of being an orphan. As I suspected, there were a lot of videos to choose from including self-hypnosis, guided visualization, meditations, affirmations, etc. but many I sampled had music that distracted me, poor sound quality and vocals that grated on my nerves rather than soothed them.

Frustrated, I noticed a strange looking video in my suggestion queue that promised a whispered hypnotic video for sleep. Is that what I think it is? I wondered

Morbid curiosity possessed me to click on it and before I knew what was happening, I was staring at a young woman who was sitting on her bed whispering at her camera. “What in the world?” I mumbled confused as to what I was watching.

Every molecule in my body told me to exit the video, but I couldn’t. There was something strangely compelling about it. Suddenly my queue was full of “whisper videos” as well as videos that promised clicks, taps, hair brushing and an assortment of other noises.

Though some people may have thought me crazy, I was like a kid in a candy store. I had no idea why these people had made these videos or exactly what the intended point of them was, but it was as though the person behind them knew instinctively what would work on me. Was it possible that they felt it too and actually made videos to create that feeling?

It appeared so. After several days of exploring this new medium, I found videos that actually mentioned the brain tingles I had felt over the years. It was wonderful to be validated by something I hadn’t talked about with anyone before. I mentioned what I had found to my husband and was surprised to learn that he had no clue what I was talking about. I mentioned the Alphabet Game, hair brushing and other activities that had put me to sleep in hopes that he could commiserate, but he said he’d never felt it.

“Oh come on,” I said, convinced he was pulling my leg. “You’ve never felt a weird tingly sensation in your scalp that’s kind of like goose bumps but…not?”

“Never,” he promised, shaking his head.

Later on I showed him one of the videos I had been watching. I can’t remember who made it now, but it was of an unseen person brushing their hair. He seemed a little perplexed by my new source of entertainment.

“Let me get this straight,” he said. “You watch this to get a funny feeling in the back of your head and then fall asleep to it.”

“Well….yeah,” I commented. “I don’t know, it’s as if when they do it to themselves, I can imagine what it would feel like if they were doing it to me.”

He took a deep breath. “Well, there’s nothing odd about watching someone on YouTube brush their hair, I guess. So, does this feeling have a name?”

“Not really. A lot of people just call it the ‘head tingles.’”

He stifled a laugh. “Well, here’s hoping that they come up with something more official than that in the future.”

Until next time, tingle on!

J-

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